Posts Tagged ‘ 30 for 30 ’

The Big Lead Articles 14 December 2009

Onion Bag: Liverpool are Lamer Than Jim Rome’s Shtick

“You aren’t fit to wear the shirt.” The normally restrained Frenchman, Arsene Wenger, resorted to a rousing English cliche, and, despite just one Englishman in the squad, it worked.  Arsenal capitalized on fortune andAndiry Arshavin’s right foot, recovering form an insipid first half for a 2-1 win at Anfield.

ESPN 30 for 30: It’s All About “The U”

Whether it was the story or the soundtrack, The U generated excitement.  Shown a 9:00 PM on a Saturday night, it was not appointment viewing, as many of us have significant others and social lives, but it was certainly appointment DVRing.

The strength and, in some cases, the weakness of the 30 for 30 documentaries is the personal fingerprint.  Here it was helpful.  Billy Corben, the director of Cocaine Cowboys and an avowed Miami fan, presents the Hurricanes’ ascendance their way.  In their own words, the “thugs,” “hoodlums” and “convicts,” as well as those who coached and covered them, describe the experience.  This film was captivating and it was successful.

Sports Business Daily Panel

I discussed ESPN’s 30 for 30 documentaries on a panel for Sports Business Daily. Check it out if you’re interested.

Thoughts on 30 for 30: Small Potatoes, Who Killed the USFL?

Mike Tollin named his first company “Halcyon Days Productions.” The title fits, since that’s precisely how he portrayed the USFL in Small Potatoes. The league was a flashy 80s production, rebellious, zany and fun. It attracted big stars. Most importantly, it was football, as evidenced with repeated, sonorous interludes from Keith Jackson and Howard Cosell. Tollin awakens a forgotten league, a Wikipedia footnote to those of us under 30, but how successfully?

Continued at The Big Lead

Review of “The Band That Wouldn’t Die”

3162247592_9f9f08b016ESPN premiered The Band That Wouldn’t Die last night, the second of their 30 for 30 documentaries.  Barry Levinson, the director of Rain Man, told the story of the Baltimore Colts leaving for Indianapolis through the Baltimore Colts’ Marching Band, who stayed together during the 12-year interim before the Ravens arrived.  The film was compassionate, well-shot and brilliant.

Continued at The Big Lead

ESPN Debuts 30 for 30 With Mixed Success

ESPN debuted its 30 for 30 documentaries project with Peter Berg’s Kings Ransom, the story of the Wayne Gretzky trade. I’m a history nut. I love documentaries. This project excited me. I wasn’t overwhelmed by this first effort, nor was I underwhelmed. I was…whelmed. I found it a bit nebulous.

Continued at The Big Lead